EYES FROM MARS
EYES FROM MARS
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waterchargerapp:

We are all grateful for Dr. Masaru Emoto and his work. Many blessings to him!
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humanoidhistory:

Europa, sixth moon of Jupiter, in rotation.
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owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1vz1VMv)
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sci-universe:

Here are some pictures from India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft.
Oh and here’s the stereotype-breaking picture showing a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success:
sci-universe:

Here are some pictures from India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft.
Oh and here’s the stereotype-breaking picture showing a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success:
sci-universe:

Here are some pictures from India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft.
Oh and here’s the stereotype-breaking picture showing a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success:
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spaceplasma:

Comet ‘Siding Spring’ headed for close encounter with Mars

Mars is about to dodge a cosmic snowball on this Sunday. On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud.
Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

For more information, click here
Credit: NASA/GSFC
spaceplasma:

Comet ‘Siding Spring’ headed for close encounter with Mars

Mars is about to dodge a cosmic snowball on this Sunday. On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud.
Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

For more information, click here
Credit: NASA/GSFC
spaceplasma:

Comet ‘Siding Spring’ headed for close encounter with Mars

Mars is about to dodge a cosmic snowball on this Sunday. On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud.
Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

For more information, click here
Credit: NASA/GSFC
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owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1xTKjKg)
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infinity-imagined:

Earth and Mars, imaged by the Narrow Angle Camera on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter on May 24th, 2014.  At the time of this photo, the Earth was at a distance of 376,687 km  from LRO, and Mars was 300 times further, approximately 112.5 million km.
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thesumisgreaterthanitsparts:

VI.XI.MMXIII
#healingforms
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sci-universe:

A fresh perspective — Russian photographer Andrew Bodrov captured several rocket launches as 360-degree panoramas in Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. They are part of his “little planet” panorama series which you can see here (I discovered panoramas of my hometown Tallinn there, what are the odds?!). They’re also available in interactive versions.
sci-universe:

A fresh perspective — Russian photographer Andrew Bodrov captured several rocket launches as 360-degree panoramas in Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. They are part of his “little planet” panorama series which you can see here (I discovered panoramas of my hometown Tallinn there, what are the odds?!). They’re also available in interactive versions.
sci-universe:

A fresh perspective — Russian photographer Andrew Bodrov captured several rocket launches as 360-degree panoramas in Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. They are part of his “little planet” panorama series which you can see here (I discovered panoramas of my hometown Tallinn there, what are the odds?!). They’re also available in interactive versions.
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rocknrollfuldead:

click to trip balls
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